oat



oat opera

A film or theatrical production about the American West (i.e., a western), especially one that is clichéd or formulaic. My grandfather and I had a tradition of watching old oat operas every Sunday on TV.
See also: oat, opera

wild oats

The youthful rebelliousness or promiscuity that one partakes in before settling down. Most commonly used in the phrase "sow (one's) wild oats." Bill and I had to break up because I was looking to get married, and he just wanted to sow his wild oats! You can't sow your wild oats forever! Soon, you'll want a wife and a house, and you'll regret the things you're doing now.
See also: oat, wild

feel one's oats

Fig. to be very lively. Careful with that horse. He's feeling his oats today. Mary was feeling her oats and decided to go out dancing.
See also: feel, oat

sow one's wild oats

to do wild and foolish things in one's youth. (often assumed to have some sort of sexual meaning.) Jack was out sowing his wild oats last night, and he's in jail this morning. Mrs. smith told Mr. smith that he was too old to be sowing his wild oats.
See also: oat, sow, wild

feel your oats

to have great confidence in your importance or ability Workers are feeling their oats and demanding higher wages.
See also: feel, oat

get your oats

  (British very informal)
to have sex regularly (usually in continuous tenses) Dan seems a lot happier these days - I think he must be getting his oats.
See also: get, oat

sow your wild oats

if a young man sows his wild oats, he has a period of his life when he does a lot of exciting things and has a lot of sexual relationships He'd spent his twenties sowing his wild oats but felt that it was time to settle down.
See You reap what you sow
See also: oat, sow, wild

feel one's oats

1. Feel frisky or animated, as in School was out, and they were feeling their oats. This usage alludes to the behavior of a horse after having been fed. [Early 1800s]
2. Display self-importance, as in He was feeling his oats, bossing everyone around. [Mid-1800s]
See also: feel, oat

sow one's wild oats

Behave foolishly, immoderately or promiscuously when young, as in Brad has spent the last couple of years sowing his wild oats, but now he seems ready to settle down . This expression alludes to sowing inferior wild oats instead of good cultivated grain, the verb sowing-that is, "planting seed"-in particular suggesting sexual promiscuity. [Mid-1500s]
See also: oat, sow, wild

feel (one's) oats

1. To be energetic and playful.
2. To act in a self-important manner.
See also: feel, oat

Common Names:

NameGenderPronouncedUsage
Babbs[bæbz]
Kane-Irish
Patience['peiʃəns]
Catherinakath-ə-REE-nə, kə-THREE-nəEnglish (Rare)
AmelieAH-me-lee, ah-me-LEEGerman
Soraso-ṙahJapanese